Its Alive

On your standard Linux or Windows desktop, you can have many applications running and visible at once in different windows. One of the windows has keyboard focus, but otherwise all the programs are equal. You can easily switch between them, but it's your responsibility as the user to move the windows around so you can see what you're doing and close programs you don't need.

Android doesn't work that way.

In Android, there is one foreground application, which typically takes over the whole display except for the status line. When the user turns on their phone, the first application they see is the Home application (see Figure 2.2, on the next page).

When the user runs an application, Android starts it and brings it to the foreground. From that application, the user might invoke another application, or another screen in the same application, and then another and another. All these programs and screens are recorded on the application stack by the system's Activity Manager. At any time, the user can press the Back button to return to the previous screen on the stack. From the user's point of view, it works a lot like the history in a web browser. Pressing Back returns them to the previous page.

0 0

Post a comment