Music and Sound

We also need sound effects and music. Since our game is an 8-bit retro-style game, it's fitting to use so-called chip tunes. Chip tunes are sound effects and music generated by a synthesizer. The most famous chip tunes were generated by Nintendo's NES, SNES and GameBoy. For the sound effects I used a tool called sfxr, by Tomas Pettersson (or rather the Flash version, called as3sfxr). It can be found at www.superflashbros.net/as3sfxr. Figure 9-16 shows its user interface.

a synthesizer. The most famous chip tunes were generated by Nintendo's NES, SNES and GameBoy. For the sound effects I used a tool called sfxr, by Tomas Pettersson (or rather the Flash version, called as3sfxr). It can be found at www.superflashbros.net/as3sfxr. Figure 9-16 shows its user interface.

Figure 9-16. as3sfxr, a Flash port of sfxr, by Tomas Pettersson

I created sound effects for jumping, hitting a spring, hitting a coin, and hitting a squirrel. I also created a sound effect for clicking UI elements. All I did was mash the buttons to the left of as3sfxr for each category until I found a fitting sound effect.

Music for games is usually a little bit harder to come by. There are a few sites on the Web that feature 8-bit chip tunes fitting for a game like Super Jumper. We'll use a single song called "New Song," by Geir Tjelta. The song can be found at www.freemusicarchive.org. It's licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) license. This means we can use it in noncommercial projects such as our open source Super Jumper game as long as we give attribution to Geir and don't modify the original piece. When you scout the Web for music to be used in your games, always make sure that you adhere to the license. People put a lot of work into those songs. If the license doesn't fit your project (e.g., if it is a commercial one), then you can't use it.

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